retrocampaigns

theyear1968:

Before the 1968 Democratic Party convention in Chicago, the Youth International Party (aka the Yippies, who included Dennis Dalrymple, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin and folk-singer Phil Ochs) nominated their own candidate, a 145-pound pig they called Pigasus.

As Jerry Rubin was reading the pig’s acceptance speech, Chicago police arrested the Yippies for disorderly conduct and seized Pigasus, effectively ending his brief political career.

The Yippies played a large part in the protests and demonstrations, largely related to the Vietnam War, that surrounded the convention. Rubin, Hoffman and five other protesters - the Chicago Seven - were charged with conspiracy and inciting to riot for their actions. Pacifica Radio Archives (housed in the Internet Archive) has a couple of great related broadcasts from that week: “Convention Coverage in Chicago" and "A Night In Chicago.”

This short film, created by the Yippies as a rebuttal to “What Trees Did They Plant?,” a program from the city and Mayor Richard Daley intended to discredit the protesters (“Those protesters, what trees did they plant?”), is a wild mash-up of old film clips with footage of the riots and police brutality, and, of course, Pigasus. It’s worth watching for the “You’re a Grand Old Pig” song-and-dance number at around 11:37 alone. (via the Internet Archive)

Welcome!

This is my regular post to explain this blog. I started this as a grad school project and kept it up mostly because its a subject that I enjoy. You may see me “like” something from this account. If I reblog your post its probably going to be here on my personal blog. One of my kiddos may reblog you, she is a competitive archer and her blog is here. While it has no bearing for the most part, her cat Angus may or may not reblog something from you. His blog is here.  He is pretty much a trouble maker and exists in this space primarily for the kiddos in college to see the new kitten every day. You can follow him if you like. He is occasionally hilarious. We also have a new kitten named Loki who now is hogging up the space there. My OTHER daughter who generally doesn’t want me messing up her coolness online takes issue at not be included. Her blog is here. You were warned!

Thanks for being here!

todaysdocument

aotus:

Help Us Innovate!

In this video, Jennifer Pahlka, U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer, invites you to make a difference and serve your country by applying to become a Presidential Innovation Fellow

We are excited that this is the first time a National Archives project is featured! For our project, “Crowdsourcing Tools to Unlock Government Records,” innovators will lead the open development of crowdsourcing tools for the public to easily contribute to government records at the National Archives and improve the effectiveness of crowdsourcing across the government.

Do you want to make a difference in government? Apply today!

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

preservearchives
preservearchives:


The new exhibit “Making Their Mark” opens at the National Archives in Washington, DC on March 21. The exhibit invites visitors to look at a signature, and imagine the moment the document was signed, and realize how each one has made its mark on our American narrative. Some signatures are famous, some show the strength of numbers, and others reveal what was going on in the world around them. We get a look into August 1799 Philadelphia with this document treated in the conservation lab for Making Their Mark: a petition signed by employees at the U.S. Mint, promising to return to work once the yellow fever epidemic passed. (Record Group 104, Records of the U.S. Mint)

preservearchives:

The new exhibit “Making Their Mark” opens at the National Archives in Washington, DC on March 21. The exhibit invites visitors to look at a signature, and imagine the moment the document was signed, and realize how each one has made its mark on our American narrative. Some signatures are famous, some show the strength of numbers, and others reveal what was going on in the world around them. We get a look into August 1799 Philadelphia with this document treated in the conservation lab for Making Their Mark: a petition signed by employees at the U.S. Mint, promising to return to work once the yellow fever epidemic passed. (Record Group 104, Records of the U.S. Mint)

todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

"Repeal Beer"

When Prohibition officially ended on December 5, 1933, booze peddlers large and small quickly did the legal thing and registered their products’ labels with the U.S. Patent Office. Here’s one aptly named product, to cash in on this “heady” time, registered with the Patent Office on March 6, 1934.

Trademark Application for Esslinger’s “Repeal Beer” Label, Case File 43336. 3/06/1934. NARA ID: 7788265

From the series: Case Files for Registered Product Labels , 1874 - 1940. Records of the Patent and Trademark Office, 1836 - 1978

(Today’s post comes via Alan Walker, an archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.)

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

"I was haunted for days by the horror of it when I first saw some of these children who work in the Cotton Mills…"

Letter from Suzanne Heber Supporting Keating-Owen Child Labor Bill, 02/25/1916

The first child labor bill, the Keating-Owen bill of 1916 used the government’s ability to regulate interstate commerce to regulate the increasingly unpopular use of child labor. The act banned the sale of products from any factory, shop, or cannery that employed children under the age of 14, from any mine that employed children under the age of 16, and from any facility that had children under the age of 16 work at night or for more than 8 hours during the day. Although the Keating-Owen Act was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson, the Supreme Court ruled that it was unconstitutional in Hammer v. Dagenhart 247 U.S. 251 (1918) because it overstepped the purpose of the government’s powers to regulate interstate commerce.
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todaysdocument:

"I was haunted for days by the horror of it when I first saw some of these children who work in the Cotton Mills…"

Letter from Suzanne Heber Supporting Keating-Owen Child Labor Bill, 02/25/1916

The first child labor bill, the Keating-Owen bill of 1916 used the government’s ability to regulate interstate commerce to regulate the increasingly unpopular use of child labor. The act banned the sale of products from any factory, shop, or cannery that employed children under the age of 14, from any mine that employed children under the age of 16, and from any facility that had children under the age of 16 work at night or for more than 8 hours during the day. Although the Keating-Owen Act was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson, the Supreme Court ruled that it was unconstitutional in Hammer v. Dagenhart 247 U.S. 251 (1918) because it overstepped the purpose of the government’s powers to regulate interstate commerce.

Read more via OurDocuments: