Welcome!

This is my regular post to explain this blog. I started this as a grad school project and kept it up mostly because its a subject that I enjoy. You may see me “like” something from this account. If I reblog your post its probably going to be here on my personal blog. One of my kiddos may reblog you, she is a competitive archer and her blog is here. While it has no bearing for the most part, her cat Angus may or may not reblog something from you. His blog is here.  He is pretty much a trouble maker and exists in this space primarily for the kiddos in college to see the new kitten every day. You can follow him if you like. He is occasionally hilarious. We also have a new kitten named Loki who now is hogging up the space there. My OTHER daughter who generally doesn’t want me messing up her coolness online takes issue at not be included. Her blog is here. You were warned!

Thanks for being here!

todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

What did the President know and when did he know it?  Find out for yourself by listening to the “smoking gun” conversation!

 On June 23, 1972, President Richard Nixon met with Chief of Staff H. R. (“Bob”) Haldeman, following the June 17 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate building.  In this conversation segment, President Nixon and Haldeman discuss the progress of the FBI’s investigation.  They especially focus on the tracing of the source of money found on the burglars.  They propose having the CIA ask the FBI to halt their investigation of the Watergate break-in by claiming that the break-in was a national security operation.

On July 24, 1974, after a yearlong legal battle, the Supreme Court announced its 8-0 ruling that President Nixon must turn over the 64 tapes subpoenaed by the Special Prosecutor.  On August 5, 1974, White House aides distributed to reporters transcripts of the June 23, 1972 audiotape, accompanied by President Nixon’s own two-page statement.  In his comments, President Nixon wrote, “portions of the tapes of these June 23 conversations are at variance with certain of my previous statements.”

Conversation 714-002, Audiotape 744 (NARA Identifier #6852462), Oval Office Recordings, White House Tapes, Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, National Archives and Records Administration.

More Watergate-Related Conversations via the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

todaysdocument
fordlibrarymuseum:

It’s time for the 2014 World Cup!
This year Brazil is hosting the tournament. Football great Edson Arantes Nascimento, better known as Pelé, helped lead the Brazilian national team to three World Cup victories in 1958, 1962, and 1970.
Pelé met with President Ford in the Rose Garden on June 28, 1975, and gave him some pointers on how to juggle a soccer ball.

fordlibrarymuseum:

It’s time for the 2014 World Cup!

This year Brazil is hosting the tournament. Football great Edson Arantes Nascimento, better known as Pelé, helped lead the Brazilian national team to three World Cup victories in 1958, 1962, and 1970.

Pelé met with President Ford in the Rose Garden on June 28, 1975, and gave him some pointers on how to juggle a soccer ball.

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

FDR officially opens the Golden Gate Bridge to vehicular traffic via remote telegraph button on May 28, 1937:
ourpresidents:

"Press Button — Opening Golden Gate Bridge"
The Golden Gate Bridge opened on this day, May 27, 1937.
On the first day only pedestrian traffic was allowed to cross. On the second day, May 28th, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ceremonially opened the bridge to vehicular traffic. 
FDR pushed a golden telegraph button from the Oval Office of the White House that was transmitted across the coast to the festivities in San Francisco.
Here is the White House Stenographer’s Diary entry for May 28th, 1937, recording FDR’s Golden Gate telegraph appointment. FDR telegraphed at three o’clock Eastern Standard Time so the California procession could begin promptly at noon.
-from the FDR Library 

todaysdocument:

FDR officially opens the Golden Gate Bridge to vehicular traffic via remote telegraph button on May 28, 1937:

ourpresidents:

"Press Button — Opening Golden Gate Bridge"

The Golden Gate Bridge opened on this day, May 27, 1937.

On the first day only pedestrian traffic was allowed to cross. On the second day, May 28th, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ceremonially opened the bridge to vehicular traffic.

FDR pushed a golden telegraph button from the Oval Office of the White House that was transmitted across the coast to the festivities in San Francisco.

Here is the White House Stenographer’s Diary entry for May 28th, 1937, recording FDR’s Golden Gate telegraph appointment. FDR telegraphed at three o’clock Eastern Standard Time so the California procession could begin promptly at noon.

-from the FDR Library 

retrocampaigns

retrocampaigns:

from “The President’s Dog,” via British Pathé

If you’re wondering: Diana Hopkins was the daughter of Harry Hopkins, one of FDR’s closest advisers who occasionally lived at the White House. And the Atlantic Charter was a joint declaration signed by President Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1941 outlining common principles for a post-war world.

Credit: British Pathé Ltd. Check them out on Tumblr, too.

todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

Judgment in Plessy v. Ferguson, 5/18/1896

Records of the Supreme Court of the United States, National Archives Identifier: 1685178

Issued on May 18, 1896, the ruling in this Supreme Court case upheld a Louisiana state law that allowed for “equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races.” It was not until the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (which coincidentally turned 60 on May 17, 2014) and congressional civil rights acts of the 1950s and 1960s that systematic segregation under state law was ended.

todaysdocument

usnatarchives:

Now on display through May 8!

The 100th anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act is May 8, 2014. The act established a national Cooperative Extension Service that extended outreach programs through land-grant universities to educate rural Americans about advances in agricultural practices and technology. These advances helped increase American agricultural productivity dramatically throughout the 20th century.

Today, cooperative extension continues to serve the educational and developmental needs of communities across the United States.

The Smith-Lever Act is currently on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.