lbjlibrary
lbjlibrary:

October 21, 1967. Antiwar protesters participating in the March on the Pentagon include students, veterans, longtime radicals and pacifists, and many activists who have been or still are active in the civil rights movement, especially religious organizations.
One such religious organization is Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Viet Nam—National Emergency Committee (CALC), led by Rev. Richard Neuhaus, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Father Daniel Berrigan, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King delivered his ‘Beyond Vietnam" speech condemning the war under the CALC auspices on April 4, 1967 and accepted the position as co-chair soon after.
 Dr. King did not support organized draft evasion, mass civil disobedience, or confrontational rhetoric, however. He is not present at the October 21 march, and indeed the larger civil rights movement is divided about how much to support the antiwar movement. 

lbjlibrary:

October 21, 1967. Antiwar protesters participating in the March on the Pentagon include students, veterans, longtime radicals and pacifists, and many activists who have been or still are active in the civil rights movement, especially religious organizations.

One such religious organization is Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Viet Nam—National Emergency Committee (CALC)led by Rev. Richard Neuhaus, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Father Daniel Berrigan, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King delivered his ‘Beyond Vietnam" speech condemning the war under the CALC auspices on April 4, 1967 and accepted the position as co-chair soon after.

Dr. King did not support organized draft evasion, mass civil disobedience, or confrontational rhetoric, however. He is not present at the October 21 march, and indeed the larger civil rights movement is divided about how much to support the antiwar movement. 

todaysdocument

ourpresidents:

It’s the Birthday of LBJ!

Lyndon Baines Johnson was born on August 27, 1908, in central Texas, not far from Johnson City, which his family had helped settle. 

In 1937 he campaigned successfully for the House of Representatives on a New Deal platform, effectively aided by his wife, the former Claudia “Lady Bird” Taylor, whom he had married after a whirlwind courtship in 1934. 

During World War II, Lyndon Johnson served briefly in the Navy as a lieutenant commander, receiving a Silver Star in the South Pacific. After six terms in the House, he was elected to the Senate in 1948. In 1953, he became the youngest Minority Leader in Senate history, and the following year, when the Democrats won control, Majority Leader. With rare legislative skill he obtained passage of a number of measures during the Eisenhower Administration. He became, by many accounts, the most powerful Majority Leader of the twentieth century.

LBJ’s “Great Society” program included aid to education, Medicare, urban renewal, beautification, conservation, development of depressed regions, control and prevention of crime and delinquency and removal of obstacles to the right to vote. Read More

Photos: 

Studio portrait of Lyndon B. Johnson at 18 months old, ca. 1910.

Portrait of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office. December, 1963.

-from the LBJ Library 

lbjlibrary
lbjlibrary:

October 11, 1967. LBJ assistant Marvin Watson learns that coordinated demonstrations are being planned for overseas in connection with the October 21 March on the Pentagon. It is a foreshadowing of the extensive overseas and domestic antiwar protests of the years to come. 
Memo, Sither to Watson, 10/11/67, #47, “Demonstrations (October 20-21, 1967) [2 of 2],” Office Files of Mildred Stegall, Box 64a, LBJ Presidential Library. 

lbjlibrary:

October 11, 1967. LBJ assistant Marvin Watson learns that coordinated demonstrations are being planned for overseas in connection with the October 21 March on the Pentagon. It is a foreshadowing of the extensive overseas and domestic antiwar protests of the years to come. 

Memo, Sither to Watson, 10/11/67, #47, “Demonstrations (October 20-21, 1967) [2 of 2],” Office Files of Mildred Stegall, Box 64a, LBJ Presidential Library. 

todaysdocument
congressarchives:

Petition from Minnie Fisher Cunningham of the Texas Woman Suffrage Association for passage of the “Susan B. Anthony Amendment” sent to Congress on May 2, 1916 The amendment passed Congress on June 4, 1919. It was ratified as the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920.
Petition from Texas Woman Suffrage Association, 5/2/1916, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives (ARC 306659)

congressarchives:

Petition from Minnie Fisher Cunningham of the Texas Woman Suffrage Association for passage of the “Susan B. Anthony Amendment” sent to Congress on May 2, 1916

The amendment passed Congress on June 4, 1919. It was ratified as the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920.

Petition from Texas Woman Suffrage Association, 5/2/1916, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives (ARC 306659)

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:


Rehabilitation of records in Repair and Preservation Division, August 12, 1942.
From the series: Historic Photograph File of National Archives Events and Personnel, 1935 - 1975

A colleague from preservearchives in action, circa 1942.  
See more images from the National Archives then and now in the series on the 80th anniversary of the creation of the National Archives from earlier this summer!

todaysdocument:

Rehabilitation of records in Repair and Preservation Division, August 12, 1942.

From the series: Historic Photograph File of National Archives Events and Personnel, 1935 - 1975

A colleague from preservearchives in action, circa 1942.  

See more images from the National Archives then and now in the series on the 80th anniversary of the creation of the National Archives from earlier this summer!

lbjlibrary

lbjlibrary:

Oct. 20, 1967. Lady Bird records in her Diary:

"Lyndon said, as he often has, that he would give a piece of his life if Speaker Sam Rayburn would be back with the gavel and he (Lyndon himself) were over in the Senate for just one week. In discussing President Eisenhower, he said: ‘He has paid me back one hundred percent for what I did for him when I was Majority Leader by just trying to be decent.’”

—Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, New York: Dell Books, 1971, pg 643. Photos: Ike and LBJ in 1955 and LBJ and Rayburn in 1956

todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

The Fiftieth Anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin Incident:

Fifty years ago on August 2, 1964, three North Vietnamese patrol boats attacked the USS Maddox in the Gulf of Tonkin. The Maddox and aircraft from the USS Ticonderoga damaged all three hostile boats, almost sinking one. Following reports of a second alleged incident two days later, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which gave President Lyndon B. Johnson advance approval to respond to military aggression in Southeast Asia without congressional consultation, and leading to an escalation of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

Read more at Prologue: Pieces of History » On exhibit: Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

The original Gulf of Tonkin Resolution is on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building from July 15 to August 7, 2014.

Welcome!

This is my regular post to explain this blog. I started this as a grad school project and kept it up mostly because its a subject that I enjoy. You may see me “like” something from this account. If I reblog your post its probably going to be here on my personal blog. One of my kiddos may reblog you, she is a competitive archer and her blog is here. While it has no bearing for the most part, her cat Angus may or may not reblog something from you. His blog is here.  He is pretty much a trouble maker and exists in this space primarily for the kiddos in college to see the new kitten every day. You can follow him if you like. He is occasionally hilarious. We also have a new kitten named Loki who now is hogging up the space there. My OTHER daughter who generally doesn’t want me messing up her coolness online takes issue at not be included. Her blog is here. You were warned!

Thanks for being here!

todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

What did the President know and when did he know it?  Find out for yourself by listening to the “smoking gun” conversation!

 On June 23, 1972, President Richard Nixon met with Chief of Staff H. R. (“Bob”) Haldeman, following the June 17 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate building.  In this conversation segment, President Nixon and Haldeman discuss the progress of the FBI’s investigation.  They especially focus on the tracing of the source of money found on the burglars.  They propose having the CIA ask the FBI to halt their investigation of the Watergate break-in by claiming that the break-in was a national security operation.

On July 24, 1974, after a yearlong legal battle, the Supreme Court announced its 8-0 ruling that President Nixon must turn over the 64 tapes subpoenaed by the Special Prosecutor.  On August 5, 1974, White House aides distributed to reporters transcripts of the June 23, 1972 audiotape, accompanied by President Nixon’s own two-page statement.  In his comments, President Nixon wrote, “portions of the tapes of these June 23 conversations are at variance with certain of my previous statements.”

Conversation 714-002, Audiotape 744 (NARA Identifier #6852462), Oval Office Recordings, White House Tapes, Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, National Archives and Records Administration.

More Watergate-Related Conversations via the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.